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Interview with Caroline Williams

--by Nic Brown--

I was fortunate enough to have the chance to talk one-on-one with one of the stars of a horror film classic, Tobe Hooper’s “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2”, Caroline Williams during the 2007 Texas Frightmare Weekend in Dallas.


Caroline it is wonderful to see you here today. Are you enjoying the Texas Frightmare Weekend?

It is bigger than I ever thought it be, much bigger than last year and to have started with such ambition and to have been so rewarding for everybody involved, it exploded with growth in just since last year! The Texas Frightmare Weekend for 2007 really has surpassed my wildest dreams. I have had the time of my life this year!

I’ve heard the same thing from a lot of the guests who were at last year’s convention as well. In fact many of the Texas based filmmakers have said that last years TFW helped them get funding for some of the projects they had to show at this year’s TFW. Have you had any of that kind of luck?

Well, I’m hoping to have some of that luck! I’ve written a film called “Fanatic” with my good friend Ethlie Ann Vare she’s with the Sci-Fi Channel and we’ve come up with a terrific movie. The setting of the film is a fan convention and it is fully scripted and ready to shoot! We sat down with Tobe Hooper three weeks ago and read the script aloud to him over lunch at Art’s Deli in L.A. Tobe was very enthusiastic and offered us some good suggestions and we’re seeing if we can get a meeting with his management company and his film company about working on the project! We’ll see what happens!

That sounds like an exciting project, good luck with it! I also wanted to ask you a few questions about “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre Part 2” which is arguably your most famous role in the horror genre. What motivated you to want to work on a sequel to such a cult classic as the original “Texas Chainsaw Massacre”?

I was impressed that Tobe Hooper wanted to do a sequel and the fact that he was directing was key for me. Plus, at that particular point [1986] I was a very ambitious young actress in Dallas and I knew that the sequel to such a classic would do very well in theaters and that it would get a wide theatrical release so it really met a lot of different dreams and ambitions for me at the time.

Caroline, how would you say the horror genre in general has changed in the 20 years since “Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2” came out?



By today’s standards the film [“Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2”] almost seems sedate and old fashioned. The film had no nudity, no overt sexuality, I won in the end and I kicked everybody’s ass! In a lot of the films over the recent years there’s been a bit of a sadistic and nihilistic element that has entered into the films. Just as a view it is tougher for me to watch some of today’s films. I think a lot of the viewers feel that sort of really out of control edge and it works for them in a great way but for me some of them really terrify me and not in the good way. That’s really the biggest change I’ve seen in the last few years.

For me and a lot of the fans of the genre the next question for you is, would you be involved in another “Texas Chainsaw” film if the opportunity presented itself?

No, I don’t think so. The series has been done as well and as often as it can be and I think Tobe Hooper’s original vision is very stand alone. I don’t think any of the succeeding interpretations have been up to what he made.

Well along similar lines, picture yourself in the directors chair for a moment...


(Laughing) That’s a big chair to fill for Tobe Hooper!

Yes it is, but if you were there, what is the one thing that you might change or do differently with “Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2”?

That’s a tough one because I like the film so much. I guess I only wish that Cannon films had not had such a strangle hold on Tobe’s creative vision. I mean so many things that were in the script did not show up in the film. That was really heart breaking for me and to all of us involved in the production. I would simply have wished that the script that was originally would have been the version of the film that was shot and that the original vision could have shown up on the screen.

Now for one silly question! Ed Gein [the killer who inspired “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre”] or Leather Face, which one is hotter?

(Laughing) Oh, Leather Face by far! He has the biggest saw in town! (Winks)





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